23 May

New York Business Roundtable on Carbon Tax

New York Business Roundtable on Carbon Tax

We invite you to join us in person or online on Tuesday, June 6th 4pm-5:30pm to learn about the national movement for carbon tax legislation, discuss a new legislative proposal for New York by NY Renews, and offer your business perspective on this important issue.

By registering, you will be informed of meeting login info or nearby host locations.
In-person gatherings will also be announced on the Facebook event.

Register NOW

Agenda

  • Introductions
  • Speaker Presentations
    • Richard Eidlin, American Sustainable Business Council
    • Stephan Edel, NY Renews
  • Q&A
  • Open Discussion & Feedback
  • Networking at in-person gatherings

The American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) is our nation’s leading business advocacy group working to implement public policies that build a sustainable economy.  While advocating for a national carbon tax, ASBC continues to partner with business organizations like NYSSBC on parallel state-level legislative efforts.

NY Renews is a statewide climate / jobs / justice coalition with more than 100 organization members. Their proposed “polluter penalty / just transition” legislation would create a fund to support initiatives to help businesses transition to renewables, support workers displaced by the transition, and protect businesses and communities that have been most impacted by the burning of fossil fuels and climate-change-related extreme weather events. This “Build the Future” fund would be financed in part by an escalating fee on pollution, or a polluter penalty.

Goals for this gathering

  1. Gather input from independent New York State business leaders on the NY Renews policy proposal
  2. Engage around the idea of legislating a price on pollution to help pay for a just transition to a sustainable economy in New York
  3. Connect with like-minded businesses both locally and across the State

We hope you can join us in person or online.
Feel free to share the Facebook event with other business owners.

We look forward to your participation on June 6th!

Register NOW

22 May

Businesses Advocate at NYSSBC’s 2017 Albany Business Summit

Business leaders from across New York State convened at the state capitol on May 8th for NYSSBC’s 4th annual business summit.  We’d like to thank all participating business leaders, policy briefers, and collaborators Clean and Healthy New York (CHNY), the New York Health Campaign, Elected Officials to Protect New York, and Environmental Advocates.

It was an especially exciting Summit this year as there were two concurrent lobby day efforts and press events taking place organized by the Divest NY Coalition and the JustGreen Partnership.  JustGreen was at the capitol to build awareness around a bill to be introduced later in the week that would regulate chemicals of high concern to children.  NYSSBC supported this bill as well and partnered with JustGreen on a couple scheduled meetings with elected officials.

The Divest NY Coalition was at the capitol advocating for the Fossil Fuel Divestment Act, a bill that we supported as well in our summit.  We also sent business leader Katie Wilson of JSA Financial over to offer the business case for fossil fuel divestment at the Divest NY press event.  Their lobby day and press event are detailed in this blog post.

In addition to the above 2 bills, we advocated for the New York Health Act (single payer system), Employee Owned Enterprises/Worker Owned Coop Bill, Uniform Treatment of Waste (fracking waste loophole), and the Secured Wages Earned Against Threat (SWEAT) act.  The NY Health Act discussions were especially well-timed as only a few days prior the U.S. House of Representatives narrowly approved legislation to repeal and replace major parts of the Affordable Care Act.

Our day consisted of morning briefings by experts on each issue, a lunch sponsored by Clean and Healthy New York, and an afternoon of meetings with elected officials and staff.  Business leaders were equipped with legislator bios and asks, bill summaries, and NYSSBC memos of support for each bill.  At the meetings, everyone had the opportunity to speak and contribute their own business story the impacts of the issue being discussed.  

NYSSBC is following these bills through this legislative session and will provide updates on additional actions needed to see them closer to passage.  Stay tuned!

25 Apr

What’s in your Cleaning Products?

For more information contact: Bobbi Wilding, CHNY, 518-708-3875, bobbi@cleanhealthyny.org                                                               

WHAT’S IN YOUR CLEANING PRODUCT? 
ANSWERS ARE ON THEIR WAY

New reporting requirements for cleaning product makers will inform public about ingredients, potential hazards

(Albany) Advocates lauded the release for public comment of a new format companies must use to disclose ingredients in cleaning products made for home and commercial use. Under a law passed in 1971, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has the authority to require disclosure of ingredients. This action is the first time such companies will be required to divulge just what their products are made of. In his release, the Governor reiterated his commitment to assess this program as a model for disclosures for other products.

“Laws that are not enforced are not worth the paper they’re written on,” said Deborah Goldberg, an attorney at Earthjustice.  “We are delighted to see the Governor exercise his long-standing authority to protect New Yorkers’ health by requiring disclosure of ingredients in household cleaning products.”

With today’s release, the DEC is directing manufacturers to report on their websites all ingredients – including in fragrances and dyes, as well as known contaminants or impurities. They must also inform the public if any of these ingredients is identified as causing or contributing to a host of diseases, such as cancer, learning and developmental disabilities, reproductive harm, asthma, and allergies. It also requires disclosing potential harm to the environment.

“Clean and Healthy New York celebrates New York’s important action to require cleaning product makers to reveal what’s in their products.  For the first time, companies will also tell consumers about health hazards an ingredient may pose. This gives New Yorkers – and all Americans – freedom to choose safer, healthier products, and gives manufacturers a strong incentive to make products without harmful chemicals,” said Kathy Curtis, Executive Director of Clean and Healthy New York. “We applaud Governor Cuomo’s repeated commitment to use this as a model for other consumer products. Now more than ever, New York must lead.”

“Studies have shown that toxic chemicals from cleaning products can be found in urine, breast milk, and blood – including the umbilical cord blood of newborns. Women need to know what chemicals they are being exposed to in order to make important decisions that may impact their health. We applaud Governor Cuomo for standing up for women’s health,” said Jamie McConnell, Director of Programs and Policy at Women’s Voices for the Earth.

“Full disclosure of all ingredients in cleaning products sold in NYS is a valuable new tool to accompany the state’s highly regarded green procurement program,” said Claire Barnett, Executive Director of Healthy Schools Network. “We congratulate the State on this action.”

“Love Canal is infamous in New York’s history because it exposed low income communities and communities of color to harmful toxic chemicals that negatively impacted the health of so many New Yorkers. Today, Governor Cuomo sent a clear signal for all in our country to see that in the new New York all communities will be protected, regardless of race or income, from harmful toxic chemicals whether they are in the products we use to clean our homes or in the dry cleaners cleaning our clothes. These new regulations couldn’t have come at a better time because of Donald Trump’s proposals to cut all funding to the U.S. EPA, especially its Office of Environmental Justice. WE ACT for Environmental Justice applauds Governor Cuomo’s leadership to protect vulnerable communities,” said Cecil Corbin-Mark, Deputy Director and Director of Policy Initiatives for WE ACT for Environmental Justice.

This action by the Department of Environmental Conservation was spurred by Earthjustice’s legal efforts, on behalf of New York-based organizations, to have cleaning product companies comply with regulatory language developed in the 1970s. Numerous companies requested clarity on the form and extent of the required reporting. This form gives that direction.

The public can comment on the form for reporting through June 14th.  The statement from the NYS DEC and the form with guidance can be viewed at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/109021.html

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21 Mar

NYSSBC Speaks at Javits Center, NYC

NYSSBC coordinated a panel for BuildingsNY, the largest gathering of property owners, managers, designers, architects, and others building trade professionals. Thousands attend this two-day event at the Javits Center: 655 W 34th St, New York, New York 10001.

Our panel covered current and pending policies at the City and State level that impact businesses in the building trade. We discussed the role of independent businesses in New York State policy advocacy and took a deep look at Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency policies relevant to New York City buildings.

Speakers from RIGHT to LEFT (in presenting order) listed below:

John Ciovacco (moderator) is the President of Aztech Geothermal, LLC, an engineering-driven, design-build contractor of innovative renewable heating & cooling systems. He serves as a resource to building owners, construction companies, engineers, architects and investors regarding the latest renewable and energy efficiency technologies, government incentives, and financing options. John is an IGSHPA Accredited Geothermal Installer, a Building Performance Institute (BPI) Certified Contractor, and Certified Green Professional with the NAHB.

Bob Rossi is the Executive Director of the New York State Sustainable Business Council (NYSSBC), an alliance of business organizations and businesses committed to advancing a vibrant, just, and sustainable economy in the state. Bob draws from his experience in academia, small business, and the nonprofit sector. He has been involved in several business startups in software, manufacturing, and green building and helped launch nonprofits including the Green Resource Hub, which promotes sustainable lifestyle and supports green business.  Most Recently, Bob founded the CommonSpot, a coworking space and social enterprise incubator in Ithaca, NY.

Bob Wyman is a renewable energy consultant and geothermal heat pump (GHP) advocate. He is currently engaged with clients who seek to dramatically increase the adoption of GHP. He also advocates for clean energy solutions in New York City such the elimination of No 6 and No 4 heating oil and the recently passed requirement that GHPs be considered for all new and retrofitted municipal buildings. Prior to engaging full time with the GHP industry, Bob spent 40+ years in the software industry making significant contributions in the areas of electronic mail, office automation, hypertext, digital rights management, multimedia publishing, and both retrospective and prospective search technologies.

Samara Swanston, J.D., has been practicing Environmental Law for more than twenty five years. She is currently the legislative counsel to the Environmental Protection Committee of the New York City Council and an Adjunct Professor at the Pratt Institute Graduate School for Urban Planning and the Environment. She was the environmental counsel to the Town of Babylon and the County of Suffolk where she litigated Long Island Pine Barrens v. Town of Brookhaven et al., the largest environmental lawsuit in state history, and was the first drafter of the legislation creating the Long Island Pine Barrens Maritime Reserve Act. Samara also was a Superfund attorney for the Environmental Protection Agency and then a manager for the Superfund program of the Department of Environmental Conservation. Samara has written numerous, extensively cited law review articles. She was also the first drafter of the local law to require coordination between the state and city for construction projects that require state wetlands or coastal erosion hazard area permits. Among other legislation, she recently wrote two local laws to promote the use of geothermal energy.

Cecil Scheib, PE, CEM, LEED AP is Chief Program Officer at Urban Green Council. With 25 years experience spearheading sustainability projects in the built environment, he leads Urban Green’s policy, research, and education initiatives. As Managing Director of the Building Resiliency Task Force for the City of New York, he led an effort to consider how to best rebuild after Hurricane Sandy in order to prepare New York City for future extreme weather events. Previously, he was Director of Energy and Sustainability at New York University, cutting energy use and greenhouse gas emissions by 30% in five years. He was the lead author on NYU’s Climate Action Plan and Energy and Water Design Standards for new construction. NYU received AASHE STARS Gold and the highest rating of any institution in the Operations category. He holds a BS in Civil Engineering from Stanford University and a Professional Engineer’s license from New York State, and is a Certified Energy Manager and LEED Accredited Professional.

09 Mar

New Community Solar Regulations are Bad for Small Business

The verdict on VDER is in and a new fight for EQUITY and RENEWABLE ENERGY begins.

New York’s Public Service Commission (PSC) regulates the value of distributed energy resources (VDER) such as community solar. The PSC — which has 3 people plus 2 empty seats — voted today to approve the regressive VDER regulations, which they claim achieve “a major milestone in the Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) initiative by beginning the actual transition to a distributed, transactive, and integrated electric system.”

The problem is the new regulations place greater power in the large utilities and grossly undervalue the energy created by community solar systems making those systems even more difficult for YOU to finance. Most small businesses and low-to-middle income people NEED the community solar option if they want to invest in clean renewable energy. We need a regulatory framework that sparks a revolution of shared solar across the state. We are ready for it!

More to come on how we can push for incentives that help level this playing field. How else will we achieve our Clean Energy Standard of 50% by 2030? The true path is FORWARD.

Check out the NY Energy Democracy Alliance’s response here: http://bit.ly/2lLOSKN